moon

Photography Fun Doesn’t Stop After Dark.

Everybody shoots sunsets.  I doubt if you could find a photographer, or any traveler with a camera, who hasn’t tried their hand at capturing that last light of the day.  And I don’t blame them.  I’ve shot more than a few sunsets myself.    But unless you’re presented with a wonderful sky full of dramatic clouds, or some exceptional reflected color, your sunset shot isn’t going to turn any heads.

That’s why Rochelle and I try to study other astronomical events to see if we can incorporate them into our photography.  And it turns out our favorite celestial body is often not the sun, but the moon.  But before I get into the ins and “mostly” outs of shooting the moon, let me tell you a bit about our most recent weekend in Yosemite. Continue reading

Get the Perfect Shot with Smartphone Apps

Don’t let the sun go down on you.  At least not without knowing exactly where and when it’s going down.  If you can integrate naturally occurring events, such as the rising and setting of the sun and moon, storms, fog, and the tides into your photography, you’re going to get shots that will make you proud.

If you’re going to get up before sunrise to get a shot, you sure don’t want to waste the effort by being in the wrong place, at the wrong time.  So, take a little time beforehand and invest in a couple of Smartphone apps.SONY DSC

Our favorite app is called the Photographer’s Ephemeris.  You can use it to find out exactly where you should be to capture a beautiful sunset or maybe a rising moon over your favorite landmark.  You can project out to future dates and to anyplace on a map.  It will take a bit of effort to master, (Rochelle is much better at it than I am) but it will pay off quickly.  You can buy a version for your Apple or Android device, or try it out for free on your desktop computer. Continue reading